Sports

  • stevesmithashes Steve Smith is Back and It’s Like He Never Left

    After a year in the wilderness, Steve Smith made his return to Test cricket amid adverse conditions, an intimidating crowd, a world-class bowling attack operating at their best, and a batting collapse to steady. The conditions were less than ideal, but Smith’s two centuries made it look like he had never left.

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  • malinga So Long Lasith Malinga, the Oddball of Cricket

    No matter how offensive his action might seem to aesthetes, Lasith Malinga’s success has paved the way for fresh innovation in the art of bowling. Today as he plays his last ODI, he will be remembered for redefining what a fast bowler could be in an era where cricket itself is undergoing tectonic changes.

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  • Can We Please Take a Moment to Cheer for Hima Das?

    Between Jofra Archer's deadly bouncers at Ashes and the shock draw in the Premier League, it’s been a hell of a weekend for sports fans. But amid all this frenzy, there is a soothing balm — and her name is Hima Das. The 19-year-old Assamese track star has quietly picked up six gold medals in as many weeks.

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  • newzealandkanewilliamsonrogerfederer Nobody Remembers the Guy Who Finished Second! They Won’t Say that About Kane Williamson and Roger Federer

    Even after the most heartbreaking of defeats, Kane Williamson’s New Zealand and Roger Federer came across as winners. In a rare sporting moment, the second runners-up were celebrated more than the men who lifted the trophy. It made us realise that sport can exist without a loser.

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  • englandwincwc Why ICC Needs to Reconsider the Boundary Rule After Sunday’s Imperfect World Cup Final

    To decide the winner of a cricket match on the basis of how the runs were scored, is to overlook the fundamental objective of the game – it is about scoring runs, not hitting more boundaries. If the two sides are level on runs, like England and New Zealand were on Sunday, clearing the fence more times than the other does not make one team better.

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  • kanewilliamsonworldcup Kane Williamson: The Monk Who Lost the Cup But Won Over World

    The most natural reaction to losing the World Cup on a technicality would have been of excessive outrage. And no one could have held it against New Zealand captain Kane Williamson were he to be taken over by anguish. It stung deep, but not even an imminent heartbreak was enough for Williamson to get carried away.

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  • slowballworldcup This World Cup Taught Us to Appreciate the Slower Ball More

    The slower ball, once a gimmicky duplicate of spin, has now emerged as a newly conceived weapon of choice. Delightfully unnatural and unpredictable, the slow ball has bamboozled more batsmen in this World Cup than perhaps all the others combined.

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  • indialossworldcup What Team India’s World Cup Defeat Taught Me About Grief and Loss

    For my best friend, who lost his mother recently, the World Cup became an antidote. With every Team India victory, I believed that its only purpose was to make my friend feel again. But when the team crashed out, we sensed an ending. It reminded us that the pain of losing a loved one is real – nobody could, and should, take it away.

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  • jofra-archer In a Team Full of Batsmen, England’s Jofra Archer Shows What a Strike-Bowler is Worth

    Constructing a batting lineup that was the envy of the rest of the world came with a price. England compromised on the quality of bowling, hoping to make up for it by outscoring the opposition. A fearsome bowler who could instill fear into the opposition’s best batsmen was the missing piece in the jigsaw. Enter Jofra Archer.

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  • Meditation-on-Loss Loss and Longing: The Agony of Being a Sports Superfan

    While victories leave us on highs, our lows are the experiences which truly define us. Losses are, after all, about latching on, and letting go. They define us. Which brings us to India’s defeat.

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