“Take Me As I Am”: A Poetic Supreme Court Panel that Killed Section 377

Social Commentary

“Take Me As I Am”: A Poetic Supreme Court Panel that Killed Section 377

Illustration: Akshita Monga

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ection 377 has died its Second Death, a Biblical concept ironically reserved for the sexually immoral… and queer people across the country are ecstatic. A few hours ago, the Supreme Court of India excised an archaic remnant of Victorian morality one which remained latched on to the Constitution even after Independence, like some contemptible parasite. It’s taken way too fucking long.

Section 377 of the IPC was initially drafted by in 1838 by Thomas Macaulay, a virulent Indophobe who once claimed that “nobody could deny that a single shelf of a good European library was worth the whole native literature of India and Arabia”. Hardly surprising that a man of his ignorance would draft a law so demeaning. Britain, of course, decriminalised its version of the law in 1967, leaving us to fester in their puritanical residue.

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