We’re The Most Dangerous Country for Women. The Change We Need is in India’s Sons

Social Commentary

We’re The Most Dangerous Country for Women. The Change We Need is in India’s Sons

Illustration: Akshita Monga/Arré

D

elhi isn’t called the heart of India for nothing. Geographically it is central, financially it is crucial, politically it is pivotal, and emotionally it seems to occupy the most inner of spaces in the country’s conscience. Of the latter, it does however play the particularly odd “other” side. For all the attention and care it gets, Delhi is, at its core, numb or indifferent; a sort of bruised corpse that looks alive only through its cuts and gashes. Nothing stirs it, nothing stokes its attention.

But six years ago, something happened. Something so monstrous that it finally got Delhi’s attention and moved it; it shook the city at the roots, and brought it first to its knees, and then on its toes. It was the reckoning of a city so deep in slumber it could only wake up if the earth fell through. But for that to happen, a 23-year-old woman had to pay a price that was not only unimaginable, but also impossible to contemplate.

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