Pixar’s Purl and Why Women Should Not Have to Act Like Men To Succeed at Work

Pop Culture

Pixar’s Purl and Why Women Should Not Have to Act Like Men To Succeed at Work

Illustration: Arati Gujar

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ixar’s short film Purl begins with a montage of a typical workday at B.R.O. Capital, where Purl, a bright pink excited ball of yarn is about to begin her first day. Within seconds, Purl realises that this is going to be a difficult place to work in. The office is full of men who look and dress the same. They show affection to each other in the form of fist bumps and high fives; laugh at sick jokes by the water cooler; and talk about gym and sports, among other Manly Man™ things. As Purl is being escorted to her cubicle, she is met, not with warm handshakes, but with confused stares and hushed whispers.

Purl has a hard time fitting in, despite being the most qualified for the job. Her colleagues don’t understand her jokes, think that her solutions for the failed Brojections are “too soft”, and keep her out of their drinking plans. Completely isolated, she finds a way to weave her way into the boys’ club. She knits herself a new personality and becomes more like her male colleagues – cracking vulgar jokes, using expletives as a sign of aggression, being obnoxious and loud during meetings.

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