Made in Heaven Review: The Zoya Akhtar Show Exposes the Regressiveness of Urban India

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Made in Heaven Review: The Zoya Akhtar Show Exposes the Regressiveness of Urban India

Illustration: Robin Chakraborty

I

t’s impossible to not derive wicked pleasure out of the fact that Made in Heaven, a biting critique of the farce that is the big fat Indian wedding, is written by three unmarried women filmmakers. I wouldn’t be surprised to find out that the web series was in fact inspired by the frustration that the writers felt about being endlessly quizzed about “settling down” – nosy Indian aunties could certainly do with an irresistible comeback.

Created by Zoya Akhtar and Reema Kagti, and written by Akhtar, Kagti, and Alankrita Shrivastava, the nine-episode long Made in Heaven operates in the extended Dil Dhadakne Do meets Zindagi Na Milegi Dobara universe. The show is concerned as much with presenting a snapshot of the affluent in South Delhi as it is with examining how the display of wealth consumes urban India at large. After all, the business of weddings – like cricket and Bollywood – provides a perfect microcosm of modern India, stuck between projecting progressiveness and concealing social regressiveness.

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