What Mirzapur Gets Right About India’s Long Relationship With Violence

Pop Culture

What Mirzapur Gets Right About India’s Long Relationship With Violence

Illustration: Akshita Monga

I

n the third episode of the Amazon Prime series Mirzapur, Ali Fazal’s Guddu exclaims, “Sabse chutiya qaum hoti hai baap ki.” The crispness of Guddu’s statement at that point, its low-handedness, cut through the visual barrier and grinned at me like a fitness coach telling a crude joke – it’s kind of true, but don’t say it out loud. Not for nothing were India’s men – raised as poorly as they were assigned role models (father figures) – looking to hide in the wake of #MeToo revelations. Mirzapur is filled with similar characters only rawer, closer to the soil.

The series swims ear-to-ear with witticisms throughout, assuaging doubt with the kind of rugged philosophy that only a country at odds with modernity could offer. The show’s frothy mix of hate, aggression, and masochism may feel distant to the urban viewer at first. But it grows on you, kind of like the climate of violence and villainy that has grown on us in the last few years. There are no heroes, there never were, this moment is trying to tell us.

READ MORE

Comments