One Decaf Cockroach Milk Latte, Please

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One Decaf Cockroach Milk Latte, Please

I’

d just ordered a large strawberry shake and some fries from McDonald’s and as I proceeded to dunk my fries into the thick, frosty shake, as I sat there, surrounded by a bevy of tots and college students, looking for a suitable mate on Tinder, my swiping was interrupted by an incoming email. A friend had emailed me a link to an article about a new type of milk, the source of which was unbelievable. Tinder was being uncharitable, so I opened up the link.

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Scorpion and insect larvae lollipops.

Dan Kitwood/ Getty images

Speculation is rife among those calling the shots in the food industry. The questions everyone is asking, “What is the future of food? Twenty or 50 or maybe 100 years from now what will you and I be eating for lunch?”

One school of thought, dominated by futurists and food tech geeks, is that the nourishment we derive from food will someday be provided by pills like those in sci-fi movies and books. Imagine walking into a restaurant and ordering your butter chicken and tandoori rotis, and voila, a tiny orange capsule accompanied by a smaller whitish one appears on your table, to be washed down with a glass of water.

Another school of thought, this one dominated by chefs and people who know all about food, is that the answer is quite literally at our feet. Insects are certainly more plausible and certainly more practical than pills. Also, nutritionally speaking, insects, pound for pound, are a better protein source than red meat. Crickets in particular have more iron and calcium than beef. Combined with the fact that insects have no trans-fat or harmful cholesterol, these might just be the perfect health food.

So as I read the news on cockroach milk, dunking my fries into that faintly pink, cloyingly sweet, partly frozen beverage, I couldn’t help but wonder, about a future in which cows, sensing their power, will soon be demanding reservations and we’ll all be beholden to cockroaches for our lactose supply. But I dread to think how many cockroaches would it take exactly, to produce enough milk to make a large strawberry McShake.

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