Asia Argento, Tinder Date Rape, and What Makes a “Good” Sexual Assault Victim

Gender

Asia Argento, Tinder Date Rape, and What Makes a “Good” Sexual Assault Victim

Illustration: Akshita Monga

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ast October, Italian actress Asia Argento became one of the first of what would be nearly a hundred women who spoke out against Hollywood mogul Harvey Weinstein’s widespread sexual harassment. In Ronan Farrow’s explosive New Yorker exposé, Argento was among the 13 women quoted, and her story made her one of the most prominent faces of the #MeToo movement. She claimed that Weinstein raped her at Cannes in 1997, and at the festival this year, made a speech referring to the star-studded event as a “hunting ground” – a nod to the Weinstein Company’s 2015 campus sexual assault documentary of the same name.

It’s a testament to how far #MeToo has come. In less than a year since Farrow’s report, the hashtag has experienced a groundswell, and turned into a juggernaut that has taken down several powerful men in Hollywood and elsewhere. We’ve seen stories of sexual harassment emerge about everyone from the lovable Aziz Ansari, to the Designated Voice of God, Morgan Freeman. Kevin Spacey has lost his place on House of Cards (his latest film seems to have garnered only $425), while Weinstein has been reduced to a fairytale monster, roaming the dusty deserts of Arizona, masturbating at vaguely women-shaped cacti.

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