Raksha Bandhan in Co-Ed Schools: An Enforced Ritual for Involuntary Bro-Zoning

Culture

Raksha Bandhan in Co-Ed Schools: An Enforced Ritual for Involuntary Bro-Zoning

Illustration: Arati Gujar

M

y favourite thing about 2000’s Mela is a furry-chested Aamir Khan doing a re-enactment of his first LSD experience in “Dekho 2000 Zamana Aa Gaya”. A close second is the sequence where Faisal Khan’s character valiantly agrees to become Twinkle Khanna’s rakhi brother after spending literally three days with the woman. A time span in which she has him and his BFF almost killed multiple times. If this isn’t bizarre enough, risking his life for a village full of strangers comes with the territory of being Rupa’s bhaiya, as does being beaten to within an inch of his life. Since this is Bollywood however, the power of the almighty bhaiya bond trounces everything at the end.

It’s a brilliant example of how we, as a society, expect any man, regardless of his consent, to be a dutiful bhaiya to whichever damsel in distress ties a colorful cotton thread on his wrist. There’s few things that are so equally detrimental to both sexes. On one hand, it fuels the already out-of-control levels of toxic masculinity in this country. And on the other, it enables white knights to further come to the aid of women who might not even really need their help. It doesn’t help that we live in a country where then-Godman, now-prisoner Asaram Bapu insinuated in 2013 that the Delhi gang rape victim should’ve addressed her rapists as “bhaiya” and they wouldn’t have harmed her.

READ MORE

Comments